Postgraduate MA/PgDip

Terrorism and Security

School of Arts & Media

Full-time

Part-time

Distance Learning

Attendance

Eight month

One year

Two year

Three year

Course

September 2019

Next enrolment
Introduction

In a nutshell

Terrorism and security issues are at the top of the political agenda in many countries. This exciting and unique course gives you the opportunity to study these issues in depth, in a dynamic and stimulating academic environment.

During your time with us, you will examine a wide range of topics in depth, including terrorist groups and their strategies and counter-terrorism policies in the US, UK, Europe and the Middle East.

You will also have the opportunity to examine the place of terrorism in relation to other threats to security, and the place of counter-terrorism strategies in relation to other state-led efforts to achieve and maintain security.

You will:
  • Learn from experts in global security and strategy who have published extensive research in respected political and historical journals
  • Gain a deep insight into global terrorism and security at a time of great change and uncertainty following the Arab Spring
  • Study modules dealing with various aspects of terrorism, counter-terrorism and security strategies
Placement

options available

International

students accepted

This is for you if...

1.

You are considering or currently engaged in careers in the civil service, the armed forces, research and teaching, international or non-governmental organisations, and the media.

2.

You want to develop an excellent foundation should you wish to pursue a PhD.

3.

You want to study a topical and professional relevant course

Course details

All about the course

This course has both full-time and part-time routes. The part-time route can be studied via distance learning.

For the full-time study option:

Semester 1: September to February
Semester 2: February to June
Semester 3: June to September

Attendance mode of study (September intake only):
MA: One year full-time
PgDip: Eight months full-time

Distance Learning mode of study (September and January intakes):
Distance Learning MA: Three years part-time
Distance Learning PgDip: Two years part-time

Semester one (full-time)

Terrorism: Threat and Response

This module will provide you with an understanding of the issue of terrorism and a comprehension of some of the problems for democratic states and international organisations (EU, UN, NATO) in responding to this threat. You will acquire the analytical tools to systematically assess the phenomenon of terrorism, its increasingly international character, and varying national and international responses to the problem.

Terrorism in Europe since 1945

On this module, you will be led through discussions and analyses of many of the major terrorist and counter-terrorist campaigns seen in Europe since 1945. The module has a comparative element, and will provide students with an advanced understanding and critical awareness of the current state of scholarship on this field of study.

Semester two (full-time)

Contemporary Security, Intelligence and Terrorism

On this module, you will be provided with a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the issues raised by recent and current practices in security, intelligence, terrorism and counter-terrorism. You will develop a comprehensive understanding of research and analytical techniques applicable to the examination current conceptual and practical developments in security, intelligence, terrorism and counter-terrorism.

The Middle East and Terrorism

This module offers you the chance to develop a critical understanding of the scope and nature of terrorism as it relates to the Middle East. You will develop the ability to differentiate between varying forms of terrorism in relation to the political and societal context from which they originate and the differing domestic, regional and international responses they provoke.

The Secret State: Domestic Security in Britain, 1883-2012

Since the late-nineteenth century, Britain has faced a number of threats to internal security. This module uses newly available primary documents to examine the British government’s response to terrorism, espionage and subversion from the formation of Scotland Yard’s Special ‘Irish’ Branch in 1883, set up to combat Fenian terrorism, to the present day counter-terror activities of the British Security Service (MI5) and police. In addition, the module explores how the British state has altered to meet individual threats, with sessions devoted to the Official Secrets Act, vetting and anti-terror legislation, looking at their impact on British political life and culture.

Strategic and Security Studies

On this module you will gain a comprehensive understanding and critical awareness of the major debates and discussions that have taken place within Strategic Studies and Security Studies over the last three decades. This includes an understanding of the differences and points of overlap in the academic disciplines of Terrorism Studies and Security Studies, a critical awareness of the different areas of interest and methodologies prevalent in Strategic Studies and Security Studies, and an advanced understanding of the way case studies are used to test theories and advance knowledge in these fields.

Please note that the above list may be subject to change as the availability of optional modules varies each year.

Semester three (full-time)

Dissertation

If you pass the taught component of the course you may then proceed to the 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits. Those not wishing to continue onto the dissertation project can be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma if leaving the course at this stage.

You may replace the dissertation with the 60 credit Terrorism and Security Practicum, subject to the Programme Leader’s approval. This involves a work placement in an organisation, business or government department where terrorism and security concerns are dealt with on an ongoing basis. You will submit a 6,000 word research paper.

Part-time structure

Year one, semester one

Core module

  • Terrorism: Threat and Response (30 credits)

Year one, semester two

Choose one optional module from:

  • Middle East and Terrorism (30 credits)
  • Contemporary Security, Intelligence and Terrorism (30 credits)
  • Strategic and Security Studies (30 credits)
  • The Secret State: Domestic Security in Britain 1883 - 2012 (30 credits)

Year two, semester one

Core module:

  • Terrorism in Europe since 1945 (30 credits)

Year two, semester two

Choose one optional module from:

  • Contemporary Security, Intelligence and Terrorism (30 credits)
  • Middle East and Terrorism (30 credits)
  • Strategic and Security Studies (30 credits)
  • The Secret State: Domestic Security in Britain 1883 - 2012 (30 credits)

Year three

If you pass the taught component of the course you may then proceed to the 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits. Those not wishing to continue onto the dissertation project can be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma if leaving the course at this stage.

You may replace the dissertation with the 60 credit Terrorism and Security Practicum, subject to the Programme Leader’s approval. This involves a work placement in an organisation, business or government department where terrorism and security concerns are dealt with on an ongoing basis. You will submit a 6,000 word research paper. This course has a placement opportunities at a NATO Thinktank at Kalkar, Germany. Both face-to-face and distance learning students have the option of applying for a placement with Intelligence Fusion.

Part-time structure by distance learning (September entry)

Year one, September to January

Core module:

Terrorism in Europe since 1945 (DL) (30 credits)

On this module you will gain an advanced understanding and critical awareness of case studies of terrorism and counter-terrorism in Europe since 1945, including the similarities and differences between these case studies. You will also develop comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the current state of scholarship in this field of study.

Year one, February to June

Core module:

Terrorism: Threat and Response (DL) (30 credits)

This module will provide you with an understanding of the issue of terrorism and a comprehension of some of the problems for democratic states and international organisations (EU, UN, NATO) in responding to this threat. You will acquire the analytical tools to systematically assess the phenomenon of terrorism, its increasingly international character, and varying national and international responses to the problem.

Year two, September to January

Choose one optional module from:

The Middle East and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)

This module offers the chance to develop a critical understanding of the scope and nature of terrorism as it relates to the Middle East. You will develop the ability to differentiate between varying forms of terrorism in relation to the political and societal context from which they originate and the differing domestic, regional and international responses they provoke.

Contemporary Security, Intelligence and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)

On this module, you will be provided with a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the issues raised by recent and current practices in security, intelligence, terrorism and counter-terrorism. You will develop a comprehensive understanding of research and analytical techniques applicable to the examination current conceptual and practical developments in security, intelligence, terrorism and counter-terrorism.

Strategic and Security Studies (DL) (30 credits)

On this module you will gain a comprehensive understanding and critical awareness of the major debates and discussions that have taken place within Strategic Studies and Security Studies over the last three decades. This includes an understanding of the differences and points of overlap in the academic disciplines of Terrorism Studies and Security Studies, a critical awareness of the different areas of interest and methodologies prevalent in Strategic Studies and Security Studies, and an advanced understanding of the way case studies are used to test theories and advance knowledge in these fields.

Year two, February to June

Choose one optional module from:

  • The Middle East and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)
  • Contemporary Security, Intelligence and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)
  • Strategic and Security Studies (DL) (30 credits)

Please note that the above list may be subject to change as the availability of optional modules varies each year.

Year three, September to September

If you pass the taught component of the course you may then proceed to the 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits. Those not wishing to continue onto the dissertation project can be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma if leaving the course at this stage.

You may replace the dissertation with the 60 credit Terrorism and Security Practicum, subject to the Programme Leader’s approval. This involves a work placement in an organisation, business or government department where terrorism and security concerns are dealt with on an ongoing basis. You will submit a 6,000 word research paper.

Part-time structure by distance learning (February entry)

Year one, February to June

Core module:

  • Terrorism: Threat and Response (DL) (30 credits)

Year one, September to January

Core module:

  • Terrorism in Europe since 1945 (DL) (30 credits)

Year two, February to June

Choose one optional module from:

  • The Middle East and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)
  • Contemporary Security, Intelligence and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)
  • Strategic and Security Studies (DL) (30 credits)

Year two, September to January

Choose one optional module from:

  • The Middle East and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)
  • Contemporary Security, Intelligence and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)
  • Strategic and Security Studies (DL) (30 credits)

Please note that the above list may be subject to change as the availability of optional modules varies each year.

Year three, February to February (12 months)

If you pass the taught component of the course you may then proceed to the 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits. Those not wishing to continue onto the dissertation project can be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma if leaving the course at this stage.

You may replace the dissertation with the 60 credit Terrorism and Security Practicum, subject to the Programme Leader’s approval. This involves a work placement in an organisation, business or government department where terrorism and security concerns are dealt with on an ongoing basis. You will submit a 6,000 word research paper.

Please note that it may not be possible to deliver the full list of options every year as this will depend on factors such as how many students choose a particular option. Exact modules may also vary in order to keep content current. When accepting your offer of a place to study on this programme, you should be aware that not all optional modules will be running each year. Your tutor will be able to advise you as to the available options on or before the start of the programme. Whilst the University tries to ensure that you are able to undertake your preferred options, it cannot guarantee this.

What will I be doing?

TEACHING

If studying by attendance you will be taught through one three-hour session per week for each module. These sessions consist of introductory lectures and seminar discussions.

Distance learning modules are run via BlackBoard, the virtual learning environment. Each week a podcast lecture will be provided, as will key readings, a further reading list and online discussion questions. You will listen to the podcast, engage with the key readings, and actively contribute to online discussions in response to questions set by your lecturers.

ASSESSMENT

You will be assessed through two essays per module each weighted at 50% of the overall mark for the module. After the successful completion of 120 credits (four modules) you will proceed to the 14,000 word dissertation (60 credits) or, for students given permission to do so by the Programme Leader, the Terrorism and Security Practicum

School of Arts and Media

The School of Arts & Media is the largest School at the University of Salford with more than 4,000 creative students. Across sites at MediaCityUK and the University's Peel Park campus, we offer a huge variety of courses, from Fashion Image Making and Styling, Television and Radio, Creative Writing and Music to Journalism, Animation, Design and Performance.

This broad range of disciplines offers enhanced opportunities for specialist and interdisciplinary study, including collaborative work across subject areas.

Employment and stats

What about after uni?

Graduates from this course follow a range of careers in the civil service, the armed forces, intelligence agencies, consultancies, international or non-governmental organisations, think tanks and research institutions and the media.

You will develop a wide range of skills on the course (writing skills, communication skills, presentation skills, and analytical skills) that are transferable to a variety of careers. This means that you can follow a range of careers in the civil service, the armed forces, international or non-governmental organisations, think tanks and research institutions, and the media.

Graduates from this course have progressed in careers within Greater Manchester Police, the Home Office, the Lancashire Police Counter terrorism Branch, the security services of other countries, IT companies in the United States as well as international organisations such as the Strategic Police Matters Unit at the Organisation for Security and Co-Operation in Europe (OSCE).You may also pursue further study at doctoral level.

Career Links

You have the opportunity to attend stimulating guest lectures, seminars and conferences, which bring researchers and practitioners together. These will make you better informed as to how the industry works and your current or future place within it.

The course’s broad introduction to cutting-edge research and current academic controversies offers an excellent foundation for further in-depth research into terrorism and security issues.

The University’s Politics and Contemporary History Research Centre builds on the active research programme provided by the Politics and Contemporary History seminar series.

Requirements

What you need to know

We welcome applications from students who may not have formal/traditional entry criteria but who have relevant experience or the ability to pursue the course successfully.

Applicants are asked to submit a personal statement with their application. A good personal statement explains why you want to do this course, why you want to do it now, and what skills you already have that will help you complete the course successfully. A demonstration of an awareness of the demands of the course (intellectually and in terms of the time commitment) is also of benefit to those reviewing your application.

Which qualifications do I need?

To join this MA you should have a second class honours degree, 2:2 or above, in Politics, History, Sociology, Criminology or related social science and humanities subject.

Applicants are asked to submit a personal statement with their application. A good personal statement explains why you want to do this course, why you want to do it now, and what skills you already have that will help you complete the course successfully. A demonstration of an awareness of the demands of the course (intellectually and in terms of the time commitment) is also of benefit to those reviewing your application.

Standard Entry Requirements

Standard Entry Requirements

To join this MA you should have a second class honours degree, 2:2 or above, in Politics, History, Sociology, Criminology or related social science and humanities subject.

We welcome applications from students who may not have formal/traditional entry criteria but who have relevant experience or the ability to pursue the course successfully.

Applicants are asked to submit a personal statement with their application. A good personal statement explains why you want to do this course, why you want to do it now, and what skills you already have that will help you complete the course successfully. A demonstration of an awareness of the demands of the course (intellectually and in terms of the time commitment) is also of benefit to those reviewing your application.

Alternative Entry Requirements

Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)

We welcome applications from students who may not have formal/traditional entry criteria but who have relevant experience or the ability to pursue the course successfully.

The Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) process could help you to make your work and life experience count. The APL process can be used for entry onto courses or to give you exemptions from parts of your course.

Two forms of APL may be used for entry: the Accreditation of Prior Certificated Learning (APCL) or the Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL).

How much?

Type of study Year Fees
Full-time home/EU 2019 £7,776per year
Full-time international 2019 £14,310per year
Part-time 2019 £1,260 per 30 credit module
Additional costs

You should also consider further costs which may include books, stationery, printing, binding and general subsistence on trips and visits.

Apply now

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Enrolment dates

September 2019

February 2020

September 2020