Postgraduate MA

International Journalism for Digital Media

School of Arts and Media

Attendance

Full-time

Part-time

Course

One year

Three year

Next enrolment

September 2020

Introduction

In a nutshell

From the BBC’s ‘Breaking News’ stories shared on social media to Al Jazeeras podcasts published on their website – Foreign Correspondence professionals are taking advantage of digital technology to reach diversifying audiences.

On this course, through either full-time or part-time study, you’ll learn how to think and act like an international journalist. 

You will:
  • Get immersed in the busy, friendly and relaxed urban environment of Greater Manchester – the northern capital of rock, music, top-rated football and a great centre of learning and culture.
  • Study at our state-of-the-art MediaCityUK campus, which is the media hub of the north, home to the BBC and ITV northern headquarters.
  • Be mentored by our well-connected and experienced broadcast and digital journalism practitioners who have worked with the BBC, ITV  and other international and national media brands.
  • Learn everything from the foundations and challenges of international journalism practice, specialist areas of international journalism to the technology, software and platforms used by digital journalists.
  • Experience a real-life environment of digital newsrooms, use our state-of-the-art TV and radio studios and explore specialisms such as foreign affairs, health and science reporting, business and finance writing or data journalism.
  • Network with industry through our special events and live brief journalism projects.
  • Once graduated, have a MA diploma, the option to gain a NCTJ accreditation and an industry-grade professional portfolio of work that can be used for PhD or potential employer applications.

Applicants from different walks of life join our course: you don’t have to be a journalism or media course graduate. Just show your engagement with news, experience in journalism or passion for reporting and we will be delighted to offer you a place once you have met all other criteria such as English language proficiency as set for your course.      

To learn more, do not hesitate to contact Programme Leader Marek Bekerman, or course enquires with any questions.

Find out more about our Journalism courses and life at Salford or continue reading to understand more about this course. 

Placement

options available

International

students accepted

On this course you could gain a NCTJ accreditation
NCTJ

This is for you if...

1.

You’re looking to gain practical experience, explore international journalism specialisms, or learn online journalism skills.

2.

You’re acting on pursuing your true passion for journalism and intend on changing your career or switching sectors.

3.

You need to study flexibly, as with our part-time option you can complete this postgraduate degree within three years.

Course details

All about the course

Our core modules have been designed to ensure that you’ll learn the key skills needed to succeed on this postgraduate course.

Throughout this postgraduate course our well-connected lecturers will arrange for you to interact with industry through guest lectures, events such as Nations and Regions: Media Future and facilitated workshops.

Our optional modules will give you the opportunity to explore one of three specialisms, whether that’s Specialist Journalism Practice, Sports Journalism or a Community Project.

You’ll be supported by your module tutors and will undertake a work placement within the journalism community of practice. In certain cases, international students may be able to undertake this work placement in their home country.

In the final semester, your focus will be on your Major Project, which gives you the option to deliver a dissertation or journalistic practice-as-research project.

Gain a deeper understanding of what you’ll explore within each module below.

Full-time: semester one

Core Module: Global Perspectives on Journalism

The module will examine the role of journalism in the world of digital media and the challenges for media organisations to adjust to the new technologies and working practices. From the birth of citizen journalism to the ‘death of the newsroom’, each week will look in detail at a current ethical, legal, editorial or industry issue and put it in an international context. During accompanying workshops, you will test the established principles of journalism in new global situations induced by the technological revolution and new working practices.

Core Module: Digital Journalism

In this module you will explore the technologies and solutions that have altered the nature and the practice of journalism this century. You will look at the dangers and opportunities afforded by social media, open source technologies, digital interactivity and new platforms for media content creation. You will create your own media projects testing new software and applications used in digital journalism to produce multimedia content rigorously observing fundamental principles in journalism.

Full-time: semester two

Core Module: Journalism Practice in a Multimedia Newsroom

Latest surveys show that editors still expect solid core journalistic skills: the ability to write tight, accurate copy, to assess and verify sources and information, and to tackle complex stories within challenging timeframes. This module will practically teach exactly that: to be able to operate in any newsroom environment as part of a fast-paced team, and to assume a range of roles in creating quality content to a narrowly defined brief. We will take you through a series of newsdays in different formats, generating stories for radio, TV and online.

One option from elective modules:

Specialist Journalism Practice

This module will concentrate on several specialisms valued by employers: international affairs and politics, business and finance, social affairs, health and science, and photojournalism. It will focus on building practical and professional portfolios and on setting up foundations for Major Project practice-as-research in semester three. The last four weeks of the module will be field work in a chosen specialism.

Community Project

After five weeks spent on learning about journalism in the community and testing the power of social media, you will embed yourself in a community of your choice, or become an intern to work for an institution or organisation on a project designed during the workshops. You will develop or run a community website, contribute to a radio station or newspaper, provide hyperlocal news and services, or get involved in a campaign testing your journalistic skills and competencies. The content generated by you will support and boost community organisations, charities or local media initiatives. This practical work experience will also build your professional portfolio.

Sports Journalism

The exciting field of sports journalism encompasses everything from football matches and rugby games to global Olympic events. In this elective module, you will learn essentials skills for writing clear and concise sports copy, interviewing players and officials, and producing match reports for print and online sports publications.

Full-time: semester three

Major Project

You will complete either a traditional academic dissertation or a ‘practice as research’ project. This allows you to demonstrate your in-depth knowledge and understanding of the subject and showcase your advanced skills in research and critical analysis and evaluation.

Part-time: Year one. semester one and two

Core Module: Global Perspectives on Journalism

The module will examine the role of journalism in the world of digital media and the challenges for media organisations to adjust to the new technologies and working practices. From the birth of citizen journalism to the ‘death of the newsroom’, each week will look in detail at a current ethical, legal, editorial or industry issue and put it in an international context. During accompanying workshops, you will test the established principles of journalism in new global situations induced by the technological revolution and new working practices.

Core Module: Journalism Practice in a Multimedia Newsroom

Latest surveys show that editors still expect solid core journalistic skills: the ability to write tight, accurate copy, to assess and verify sources and information, and to tackle complex stories within challenging timeframes. This module will practically teach exactly that: to be able to operate in any newsroom environment as part of a fast-paced team, and to assume a range of roles in creating quality content to a narrowly defined brief. We will take you through a series of newsdays in different formats, generating stories for radio, TV and online.

Part-time: Year two. semester one and semester two

Core Module: Digital Journalism

In this module you will explore the technologies and solutions that have altered the nature and the practice of journalism this century. You will look at the dangers and opportunities afforded by social media, open source technologies, digital interactivity and new platforms for media content creation. You will create your own media projects testing new software and applications used in digital journalism to produce multimedia content rigorously observing fundamental principles in journalism.

And one option from:

Specialist Journalism Practice

This module will concentrate on several specialisms valued by employers: international affairs and politics, business and finance, social affairs, health and science, and photojournalism. It will focus on building practical and professional portfolios and on setting up foundations for Major Project practice-as-research in semester three. The last four weeks of the module will be field work in a chosen specialism.

Community Project

After five weeks spent on learning about journalism in the community and testing the power of social media, you will embed yourself in a community of your choice, or become an intern to work for an institution or organisation on a project designed during the workshops. You will develop or run a community website, contribute to a radio station or newspaper, provide hyperlocal news and services, or get involved in a campaign testing your journalistic skills and competencies. The content generated by you will support and boost community organisations, charities or local media initiatives. This practical work experience will also build your professional portfolio.

Sports Journalism

The exciting field of sports journalism encompasses everything from football matches and rugby games to global Olympic events. In this elective module, you will learn essentials skills for writing clear and concise sports copy, interviewing players and officials, and producing match reports for print and online sports publications.

Part-time: Year three

Major Project

You will complete either a traditional academic dissertation or a ‘practice as research’ project. This allows you to demonstrate your in-depth knowledge and understanding of the subject and showcase your advanced skills in research and critical analysis and evaluation.

Please note that it may not be possible to deliver the full list of options every year as this will depend on factors such as how many students choose a particular option. Exact modules may also vary in order to keep content current. When accepting your offer of a place to study on this programme, you should be aware that not all optional modules will be running each year. Your tutor will be able to advise you as to the available options on or before the start of the programme. Whilst the University tries to ensure that you are able to undertake your preferred options, it cannot guarantee this.

What will I be doing?

TEACHING

You’ll be provided with a timetable that’ll include a breakdown of your scheduled lessons with timeslots for you to explore your independent research interests.
Your classes will be based at our MediaCityUK campus. 

Our technical demonstrators will teach you the skills needed to use our specialist journalism suites including newsrooms, TV and radio studios.

Our lecturers will teach you through a range of methods from lectures, presentations, seminars and workshops aimed at developing your understanding of the theory and practice of international and online journalism.

 

ASSESSMENT

Once you’ve completed your modules, you’ll be awarded with a certain amount of credits that’ll eventually contribute towards your overall finished award. These grades can be a fail, pass, merit (or credit) and distinction.

Our assessment methods include reviewing your academic and practical response to our modules.

We’ll assess your:

  • production exercises and portfolios of work
  • response to practical media projects
  • peer reviewing
  • research and essays
  • response to delivering oral presentations
  • work-based learning diaries and reports
  • dissertation or major project supported by substantial self-reflection

Teaching Staff

All our lecturers come from the industry with many years’ experience of working for high-profile media organisations, and some still have links with or work for them.  

Marek Bekerman, Programme Leader

After more than 20 years with BBC Global News, Marek Bekerman joined the University of Salford as lecturer in International and Radio Journalism to become programme leader for MA International and Online Journalism in 2014. He had worked as broadcast journalist, news and current affairs editor and producer for a range BBC World Service radio programmes before going into journalism training and media development work for the BBC on overseas assignments in the Former Soviet Union, the Caucasus, Central Asia and the Middle East

 

Seamus Simpson, Professor of Media Policy.

Seamus research interests lie in European and global media policy and regulation. Seamus's research has been funded by the ESRC and the European Commission and he is a member of the ESRC's Peer Review College. 

 

Dr Carole O’Reilly, Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies

Dr Carole O’Reilly graduated from the National University of Ireland (Cork) and worked as a feature writer on various local and national newspapers and magazines. Her research interests include published work in the area of representation of Irish people on British television, women in popular music video, and newspaper history. 

 

Kate Feld

Kate Feld specialises in cultural journalism and innovation in digital media practice. An active blogger and social media activist, Kate has run and advised on a range of digital journalism projects, delivered blogging, social media and writing workshops for corporate clients including the BBC, Manchester Digital Development Agency, and Arts Council England.

 

Steve Boulton

Steve Boulton is one of the most experienced current affairs executives in the UK. A former editor of Granada's iconic World In Action, he has been working since 1998 with Channel 4 Dispatches and has taken charge of major projects for leading broadcasters including BBC Panorama, Five and Al Jazeera English. He has won many awards, including a Bafta, and was consultant to the feature documentary Virunga, nominated in the 2015 Baftas and Oscars.

 

Sara Hadwin

Sara's journalism career spanned roles from reporter to publisher. She launched a newspaper and edited an evening newspaper, weekly newspapers, websites and lifestyle and arts magazines. Most recently, she edited the North West Evening Mail, Barrow, with four editions daily. 

School of Art and Media

All journalism courses are delivered by the School of Arts and Media. Our School and University has strong and long-lasting relationships with local and national industry. Once you graduate with us you’ll join a thriving alumni community in Greater Manchester and beyond.

Facilities

This course is delivered at the University’s state of the art facility at MediaCityUK, which has specialist journalism suites including newsrooms, TV and radio studios staffed by highly competent technicians, demonstrators and trainers who will teach you the skills in using the latest broadcast, editing and production software and in the expert use of the latest equipment such as cameras, recorders, lighting and sound kits or editing suites and studio galleries.

Employment and stats

What about after uni?

Graduates can enter careers in various forms of journalism (print, broadcast or online) either in reporting or management roles, public relations, researchers, media analysts and advisers all either working in this country or abroad. Journalists could work as UK-based foreign correspondents travelling abroad or full-time in overseas postings.

Further Study

Graduates showing strong academic and research skills can pursue a further academic research path through our doctoral (PhD) programmes on a full-time or part-time basis subject to a satisfactory proposal

Career Links

This course is based at MediaCityUK, with the BBC and ITV studios next door, and our students benefit from the strong relationships that our journalism courses have developed with the regional press as well as local radio and TV stations over the years. Our links with media education establishments abroad and with international organisations and global media outlets keep our graduates in touch with the pulse of the industry and up to date with the latest trends to keep them at the top of employability in the media sector.

Requirements

What you need to know

Once you have graduated and went into the open world of the highly competitive media environment, the skills and practical knowledge gained in the course of the study can not only open doors to jobs in journalisms, but be an eye-opener to new opportunities.

Our graduates have not only upscaled their careers but sometimes ended up in jobs they never dreamed of. One of our graduates is an TV anchor on a national TV channel n Indonesia, while another one runs a high-profile news website on the polar regions and the Artic marine life while travelling on icebreakers with North Pole and Antractic expeditions. It seems that the possibilities in the realm of the media can be endless in an international context – something increasingly recognized by UK-based students who are joining our course in ever increasing numbers.

One of the job clinchers generate by our course will be your portfolio of journalistic work to showcase your skills and abilities in front of an interviewer or prospective employer.

You can also explore various forms of journalism (print, broadcast or online) either in reporting or management roles, public relations, researchers, media analysts and advisers all either working in this country or abroad. Journalists could work as UK-based foreign correspondents travelling abroad or full-time in overseas postings.

10 questions to help you prepare your International Journalism personal statement

Some experts say that journalism is about asking the right questions to the right people at the right time. Here are the questions for you at application time:

  1. Do you have a passion for journalism, and can you demonstrate it?
  2. Why do you want to be a journalist and where do you want to work I the future?
  3. Who is your journalistic role model and why?
  4. What experience do you already have in journalism?
  5.  What is the best piece of journalism you have produced so far? (if you can, provide a link).
  6. Are you engaged with news and current affairs in an international dimension?
  7. What are the key issues affecting journalism right now?
  8. How will the media industry change in the years ahead and what role do you hope to play?
  9. Why you want to study at the University of Salford?

What aspects of our course appeal to you and why do you think it is right for you?

English Language requirements

International applicants will be required to show a proficiency in English. An IELTS score of 7.0, with a written element of 8.0 and no element below 6.0, is proof of this.

Standard entry requirements

Standard entry requirements

A good honours degree (2:1 or above).

Alternative entry requirements

Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)

We welcome applications from students who may not have formal/traditional entry criteria but who have relevant experience or the ability to pursue the course successfully.

The Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) process could help you to make your work and life experience count. The APL process can be used for entry onto courses or to give you exemptions from parts of your course.

Two forms of APL may be used for entry: the Accreditation of Prior Certificated Learning (APCL) or the Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL).

How much?

Type of study Year Fees
Full-time home/EU 2020/21 £7,920per year
Full-time international 2020/21 £14,670per year
Additional costs

You should also consider further costs which may include books, stationery, printing, binding and general subsistence on trips and visits.

Scholarships for international students 2020/21

If you are a high-achieving international student, you may be eligible for one of our international scholarships worth up to £5,000. Our international scholarships include the Salford International Excellence Scholarship.

For more information go to International Scholarships.

Apply now

All set? Let's apply

Enrolment dates

September 2020